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Experiences That Matter: Membership Involvement of Young Adult Members in Voluntary Sports Clubs in the Netherlands

Received: 28 May 2021    Accepted: 17 June 2021    Published: 6 July 2021
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Abstract

Many young people in the Netherlands participate in voluntary sports clubs (VSCs) but stop once they become adults. VSCs lack the ability to transition their youth members to adult members, which threatens the size of the clubs in terms of membership, the income, and the availability of volunteers. This research aims to identify experiences of young adult members that contribute to membership involvement (MI) and intentions to support the club and continue membership (membership commitment). A mixed-method approach consisting of a qualitative and a quantitative study was used. The results showed that young adult members elaborate on a wide range of experiences that predicts MI at four stages of membership. These experiences can be classified into the pleasure when participating in sports (enjoyment), the service and support within the club (care), and the social connectedness among the members (closeness). Moreover, the results revealed that MI performs as a mediator for membership commitment. The conclusion indicates that experiences of young adult members are integrated system, one cannot do without the other. This integrative system of experiences determines membership involvement in all stages of membership, from less than one year to long-term memberships. For clubs it is important to address these experiences because MI is important for the development of membership commitment - loyal and supportive young adult members.

DOI 10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11
Published in Social Sciences (Volume 10, Issue 4, August 2021)
Page(s) 160-171
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Organized Sports, Involvement Theory, Young Adults Membership

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  • APA Style

    Nanny Kuijsters-Timmers, John Goedee, Roger Th. Leenders. (2021). Experiences That Matter: Membership Involvement of Young Adult Members in Voluntary Sports Clubs in the Netherlands. Social Sciences, 10(4), 160-171. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11

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    ACS Style

    Nanny Kuijsters-Timmers; John Goedee; Roger Th. Leenders. Experiences That Matter: Membership Involvement of Young Adult Members in Voluntary Sports Clubs in the Netherlands. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(4), 160-171. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11

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    AMA Style

    Nanny Kuijsters-Timmers, John Goedee, Roger Th. Leenders. Experiences That Matter: Membership Involvement of Young Adult Members in Voluntary Sports Clubs in the Netherlands. Soc Sci. 2021;10(4):160-171. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11,
      author = {Nanny Kuijsters-Timmers and John Goedee and Roger Th. Leenders},
      title = {Experiences That Matter: Membership Involvement of Young Adult Members in Voluntary Sports Clubs in the Netherlands},
      journal = {Social Sciences},
      volume = {10},
      number = {4},
      pages = {160-171},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ss.20211004.11},
      abstract = {Many young people in the Netherlands participate in voluntary sports clubs (VSCs) but stop once they become adults. VSCs lack the ability to transition their youth members to adult members, which threatens the size of the clubs in terms of membership, the income, and the availability of volunteers. This research aims to identify experiences of young adult members that contribute to membership involvement (MI) and intentions to support the club and continue membership (membership commitment). A mixed-method approach consisting of a qualitative and a quantitative study was used. The results showed that young adult members elaborate on a wide range of experiences that predicts MI at four stages of membership. These experiences can be classified into the pleasure when participating in sports (enjoyment), the service and support within the club (care), and the social connectedness among the members (closeness). Moreover, the results revealed that MI performs as a mediator for membership commitment. The conclusion indicates that experiences of young adult members are integrated system, one cannot do without the other. This integrative system of experiences determines membership involvement in all stages of membership, from less than one year to long-term memberships. For clubs it is important to address these experiences because MI is important for the development of membership commitment - loyal and supportive young adult members.},
     year = {2021}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Experiences That Matter: Membership Involvement of Young Adult Members in Voluntary Sports Clubs in the Netherlands
    AU  - Nanny Kuijsters-Timmers
    AU  - John Goedee
    AU  - Roger Th. Leenders
    Y1  - 2021/07/06
    PY  - 2021
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11
    T2  - Social Sciences
    JF  - Social Sciences
    JO  - Social Sciences
    SP  - 160
    EP  - 171
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2326-988X
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211004.11
    AB  - Many young people in the Netherlands participate in voluntary sports clubs (VSCs) but stop once they become adults. VSCs lack the ability to transition their youth members to adult members, which threatens the size of the clubs in terms of membership, the income, and the availability of volunteers. This research aims to identify experiences of young adult members that contribute to membership involvement (MI) and intentions to support the club and continue membership (membership commitment). A mixed-method approach consisting of a qualitative and a quantitative study was used. The results showed that young adult members elaborate on a wide range of experiences that predicts MI at four stages of membership. These experiences can be classified into the pleasure when participating in sports (enjoyment), the service and support within the club (care), and the social connectedness among the members (closeness). Moreover, the results revealed that MI performs as a mediator for membership commitment. The conclusion indicates that experiences of young adult members are integrated system, one cannot do without the other. This integrative system of experiences determines membership involvement in all stages of membership, from less than one year to long-term memberships. For clubs it is important to address these experiences because MI is important for the development of membership commitment - loyal and supportive young adult members.
    VL  - 10
    IS  - 4
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Sports Marketing and Sports Communication (SPECO), Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Tilburg, the Netherlands; Tilburg School of Humanities and Digital, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands

  • Tilburg School of Humanities and Digital, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands; Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands; Jheronimus Academy of Data Science & Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands

  • Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands; Jheronimus Academy of Data Science & Tilburg School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands

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