Social Sciences

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Influence of Places of Resident Activities on Spatial Distribution of Drug-Related Crimes

Received: 10 May 2021    Accepted: 24 May 2021    Published: 31 May 2021
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Abstract

Drug-related crimes have become a common worldwide concern, and studies have considered the influence of different types of land use on such crimes. However, the dynamic visitor flow rate has rarely been taken into consideration when analyzing the cause of drug-related crimes, with most studies only using static population distribution data. Differences between the main factors associated with drug-related crimes on different streets have also rarely been discussed. In this study, the spatial distribution of and factors associated with drug-related crimes were explored from the perspective of residents’daily activities, and the main factors associated with such crimes on different streets were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that drug-related crimes are characterized by significant spatial heterogeneity and clustering; the spatial distribution of drug-related crimes is closely correlated with places of resident activity. More specifically, the denser the distribution of restaurant services and recreational facilities (e.g., cyber cafes and bars) on a street, the more likely drug-related crimes are to occur there. Drug-related crimes on different streets are associated with different factors those on commercial-oriented streets are mainly distributed in areas with dense restaurant services and recreational facilities, while those on streets dominated by industrial parks, residential areas, and woodlands primarily occur where there are high-density traffic facilities and cyber cafes or areas with a high visitor flow rate.

DOI 10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14
Published in Social Sciences (Volume 10, Issue 3, June 2021)
Page(s) 101-112
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Drug-Related Crimes, Land Use Type, Dynamic Visitor Flow Rate, Crime Geography

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  • APA Style

    Yimeng Liu, Weihong Li, Guoqing Liu, Xiaorui Yang, Yunjian Guo, et al. (2021). Influence of Places of Resident Activities on Spatial Distribution of Drug-Related Crimes. Social Sciences, 10(3), 101-112. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14

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    ACS Style

    Yimeng Liu; Weihong Li; Guoqing Liu; Xiaorui Yang; Yunjian Guo, et al. Influence of Places of Resident Activities on Spatial Distribution of Drug-Related Crimes. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(3), 101-112. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14

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    AMA Style

    Yimeng Liu, Weihong Li, Guoqing Liu, Xiaorui Yang, Yunjian Guo, et al. Influence of Places of Resident Activities on Spatial Distribution of Drug-Related Crimes. Soc Sci. 2021;10(3):101-112. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14,
      author = {Yimeng Liu and Weihong Li and Guoqing Liu and Xiaorui Yang and Yunjian Guo and Kewen Zhang},
      title = {Influence of Places of Resident Activities on Spatial Distribution of Drug-Related Crimes},
      journal = {Social Sciences},
      volume = {10},
      number = {3},
      pages = {101-112},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ss.20211003.14},
      abstract = {Drug-related crimes have become a common worldwide concern, and studies have considered the influence of different types of land use on such crimes. However, the dynamic visitor flow rate has rarely been taken into consideration when analyzing the cause of drug-related crimes, with most studies only using static population distribution data. Differences between the main factors associated with drug-related crimes on different streets have also rarely been discussed. In this study, the spatial distribution of and factors associated with drug-related crimes were explored from the perspective of residents’daily activities, and the main factors associated with such crimes on different streets were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that drug-related crimes are characterized by significant spatial heterogeneity and clustering; the spatial distribution of drug-related crimes is closely correlated with places of resident activity. More specifically, the denser the distribution of restaurant services and recreational facilities (e.g., cyber cafes and bars) on a street, the more likely drug-related crimes are to occur there. Drug-related crimes on different streets are associated with different factors those on commercial-oriented streets are mainly distributed in areas with dense restaurant services and recreational facilities, while those on streets dominated by industrial parks, residential areas, and woodlands primarily occur where there are high-density traffic facilities and cyber cafes or areas with a high visitor flow rate.},
     year = {2021}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Influence of Places of Resident Activities on Spatial Distribution of Drug-Related Crimes
    AU  - Yimeng Liu
    AU  - Weihong Li
    AU  - Guoqing Liu
    AU  - Xiaorui Yang
    AU  - Yunjian Guo
    AU  - Kewen Zhang
    Y1  - 2021/05/31
    PY  - 2021
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14
    T2  - Social Sciences
    JF  - Social Sciences
    JO  - Social Sciences
    SP  - 101
    EP  - 112
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2326-988X
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ss.20211003.14
    AB  - Drug-related crimes have become a common worldwide concern, and studies have considered the influence of different types of land use on such crimes. However, the dynamic visitor flow rate has rarely been taken into consideration when analyzing the cause of drug-related crimes, with most studies only using static population distribution data. Differences between the main factors associated with drug-related crimes on different streets have also rarely been discussed. In this study, the spatial distribution of and factors associated with drug-related crimes were explored from the perspective of residents’daily activities, and the main factors associated with such crimes on different streets were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that drug-related crimes are characterized by significant spatial heterogeneity and clustering; the spatial distribution of drug-related crimes is closely correlated with places of resident activity. More specifically, the denser the distribution of restaurant services and recreational facilities (e.g., cyber cafes and bars) on a street, the more likely drug-related crimes are to occur there. Drug-related crimes on different streets are associated with different factors those on commercial-oriented streets are mainly distributed in areas with dense restaurant services and recreational facilities, while those on streets dominated by industrial parks, residential areas, and woodlands primarily occur where there are high-density traffic facilities and cyber cafes or areas with a high visitor flow rate.
    VL  - 10
    IS  - 3
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • School of Geography, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

  • SCNU Qingyuan Institute of Science and Technology Innovation Co., Ltd., Qingyuan, China

  • School of Geography, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

  • School of Geography, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

  • School of Geography, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

  • School of Geography, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China

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