Volume 8, Issue 3, June 2019, Page: 132-140
Predictors of Household Food Sufficiency in Singida Municipality, Tanzania
Emmanuel Simon Mwang’onda, Regional Department, Institute of Rural Development Planning (IRDP), Dodoma, Tanzania
Peter Elia Mosha, Department of Population Studies, Institute of Rural Development Planning (IRDP), Dodoma, Tanzania
Steven Lee Mwaseba, Regional Department, Institute of Rural Development Planning (IRDP), Dodoma, Tanzania
Received: May 3, 2019;       Accepted: Jun. 3, 2019;       Published: Jul. 9, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ss.20190803.19      View  107      Downloads  18
Abstract
Incidences of food shortage and poverty are highly reported on Africa specifically sub-Saharan part, despite having a large number of the population engaging in agriculture residing in the rural area. Different scholars have managed to associate food security which involves food availability, food access, food utilization and stability at the household level with various factors. The study takes a similar root in pinning down factors related to the food shortage in Singida. Taking into account socio-economic characteristics of household in analysis, it is indicated that food shortage in Singida area is more pronounced during farming season, that is November to March and it is associated with gender, marital status, education level, occupation and place of residence of the household head. Meanwhile, age of head of household, total manpower in the household, amount of maize harvested, the use of fertilizer, farm size and household expenditure on food had no significant effect in determining food shortage at the household level. Since education has shown a significant positive effect of not having food shortage, and community in Singida depends much on rain-fed agriculture system, the problem of food shortage may be tackled through extension services toward creating awareness on improved agriculture practice for more farm yield given the small piece of land available, and improvement in storage mechanism.
Keywords
Food Shortage, Poverty, Hunger, Small Scale Agriculture
To cite this article
Emmanuel Simon Mwang’onda, Peter Elia Mosha, Steven Lee Mwaseba, Predictors of Household Food Sufficiency in Singida Municipality, Tanzania, Social Sciences. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2019, pp. 132-140. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20190803.19
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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