Volume 7, Issue 6, December 2018, Page: 242-247
Current Armenian Society: The Rise of Radical Attitudes
Gevorg Poghosyan, Institute of Philosophy, Sociology and Law, Armenian National Academy of Sciences, Yerevan, Armenia
Vladimir Osipov, Institute of Philosophy, Sociology and Law, Armenian National Academy of Sciences, Yerevan, Armenia
Received: Sep. 11, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 28, 2018;       Published: Oct. 24, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ss.20180706.11      View  221      Downloads  18
Abstract
This article discusses radicalism as a phenomenon that has become widespread throughout the world, extremism and terrorism that it engenders and the meaning, content and correlation of the key concepts as well as sources, root causes and manifestation forms of those phenomena. Effective fight against those intricate phenomena is hampered by the absence of their common interpretation and agreed-upon definitions and of a well-established methodological foundation for their research. Factors that generate and sustain radicalism and extremism include increase in social injustice and inequality, the growing scope of poverty, unemployment and corruption, the dismantling of the system of social guarantees, legal insecurity of person and property, refusal from democratic reforms, the strengthening of authoritarian tendencies, weak rule-of-law State and civil society, the disintegration of a traditional value system, latent and explicit normative conflicts, the lack of access to effective political and educational institutions, the impossibility to change the current state of affairs through democratic methods, the absence of channels for venting out discontent and unwillingness on the part of State entities and political actors to take public discontent into consideration. It is important to note that radicalism and support extremism are also boosted by unjustified and unlawful use of violence by State agencies as well as violation of fundamental human rights and freedoms of individuals that are suspected of committing terrorist acts and/or of holding membership in a banned extremist organization. The process of radicalization of the Armenian society has been going on for a long time. It can be accounted for by the fact that the public at large made certain demands as it had certain expectations for the authorities, while the authorities, in their turn, either reacted slowly, with a delay or did not react at all. In the quarter-century after gaining independence, Armenia experienced several outbreaks of political radicalism, which at times grew into extremist and even terrorist actions. The economic crisis, the blockade of roads, migration and unemployment serve as a fertile ground for the growth of protest sentiments, especially among Armenian youth. While youth activism is sometimes perceived with enthusiasm, it should be borne in mind that any social confrontation and civil disobedience have their inner logic of evolution. The situation may deteriorate progressively because radicalization is the most likely scenario in the dynamic of social confrontation resulting in widespread violence, chaos and disruption of social fabric.
Keywords
Radicalism, Extremism, Terrorism, Armenian Society, Youth Movements
To cite this article
Gevorg Poghosyan, Vladimir Osipov, Current Armenian Society: The Rise of Radical Attitudes, Social Sciences. Vol. 7, No. 6, 2018, pp. 242-247. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20180706.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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