Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2016, Page: 7-15
Target Killings in Karachi, Pakistan
Muhammad Anjum Saeed, Department of Anthropology, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan
Rao Nadeem Alam, Department of Anthropology, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan
Received: Feb. 5, 2016;       Accepted: Feb. 29, 2016;       Published: Mar. 28, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ss.20160502.11      View  5209      Downloads  117
Abstract
Target killing has become a worse phenomenon and it is difficult to justify the state’s atrocities against her citizens. States are adopted this tool for controlling uprising and mutiny within the legitimate boundaries. This paper tries to find out the basic reasons for target killing. This paper also instigates the rise of ethic extremism in Pakistan particularly in Karachi.
Keywords
Target Killing, Karachi, Terrorism, Money Extortion & Crime
To cite this article
Muhammad Anjum Saeed, Rao Nadeem Alam, Target Killings in Karachi, Pakistan, Social Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2016, pp. 7-15. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20160502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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