Volume 4, Issue 4, August 2015, Page: 90-93
The Place of Customary and Religious Laws and Practices in Ethiopia: A Critical Review of the Four Modern Constitutions
Endalcachew Bayeh, Ambo University, Department of Civics and Ethical Studies, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Ambo, Ethiopia
Received: Jul. 3, 2015;       Accepted: Jul. 24, 2015;       Published: Aug. 6, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.ss.20150404.14      View  5985      Downloads  106
Abstract
The objective of this paper is to examine the place of customary and religious laws and practices in the Ethiopian constitutions. To this end, the study made comparison as to the place of those elements in the four constitutions, thereby implying the changes and continuities. As a result, the study shows that the 1995 FDRE constitution better incorporated the customary and religious laws and practices as compared to other constitutions. The 1987 PDRE constitution is also relatively good compared to the 1931 and 1955 Imperial constitutions in terms of recognizing those elements in a way that can ensure equality of all sections of the society.
Keywords
Constitution, Custom, Ethiopia, Language, Religion
To cite this article
Endalcachew Bayeh, The Place of Customary and Religious Laws and Practices in Ethiopia: A Critical Review of the Four Modern Constitutions, Social Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2015, pp. 90-93. doi: 10.11648/j.ss.20150404.14
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